Permalink

“The third principal composer in the Vereinigung schaffender Tonkünstler was Karl Weigl. Like Schoenberg, he was a pupil of Zemlinsky and, like Webern and Wellesz, he studied musicology with Adler. In common with… Continue reading

Permalink

Arnold and Justine Rosé’s grave in the Grinzinger Friedhof in Vienna with a memorial to their daughter Alma. She was also a violinist and sometimes performed with her father in Bach’s Double Violin… Continue reading

Permalink

Permalink

A passage from Toch’s 1921 Die chinesische Flöte, based on the same Hans Bethge collection of oriental poetry that spurred Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde.

Permalink

“Schreker was widely regarded as Jewish though he had been brought up as Roman Catholic by his mother, a member of Austria’s impoverished aristocracy. Alfred Heuß greeted the premiere of Der Schatzgräber in… Continue reading

Permalink

  A new recording of Schreker’s Der Schatzgräber, captured at De Nederlandse Opera last September, will be released later this year on Challenge Classics.

Permalink

“Schreker had nevertheless been the object of frequent anti-Semitic vilification even before the Nazi dictatorship of 1933, forcing his move from Berlin’s Music Academy to the Prussian Academy of Arts. With Hitler’s arrival,… Continue reading

Permalink

A mini-documentary about the Orchestra of the Swan, an ensemble has done a huge amount to re-establish Hans Gál’s music within the repertoire.

Permalink

“Gál was a master of his craft. He was an accomplished pianist and a fine cellist and, as with many other Adler students, he was also a musical polymath: his doctoral dissertation had… Continue reading

Permalink

“Charlie Chaplin, Eisler’s friend in postwar Hollywood, described the ruthlessness of the Eisler siblings as coming out of one of Shakespeare’s histories. Hanns Eisler’s use of music as a ‘political weapon’ would be… Continue reading