The Heavy Loss of the “Light Weight” Edmund Eysler

Say Viennese operetta to anyone and they most likely think of Johann Strauss or Franz Lehár. In any case, both Fledermaus and Die lustige Witwe (The Merry Widow) have pushed their way into… Continue reading

A Salutary New Year’s Address from January 1, 1871

Daniel Spitzer, unfamiliar to English readers, was an Austrian sketch writer in 19th century Imperial Vienna’s paper of record, die Presse, then later relaunched as die Neue Freie Presse. I mention him once… Continue reading

Leo Carey’s fascinating review of new books on Mahler in the New York Review of Books

It’s been some time since I’ve written on this blog, and having just returned from a fascinating trip to the United States, there is a good deal to write about. All of this… Continue reading

The Lost Legacy of the Netherlands

Every conference has its revelations. The one in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern’s lovely capital city Schwerin in early October 2015 was no different. After decades of researching material and believing that perhaps it was possible to… Continue reading

The Musical Price Paid for British Betrayal

The story of Czechoslovakia’s betrayal is illustrated by the loss of composers who were either murdered or died in exile. This is merely to underline again that it is head-in-the-sand to declare politics… Continue reading

G.E.R. Gedye’s Eye-Witness Account of Austro-Fascism

In this blog and in my book Forbidden Music, I have tried to stress the importance of the five year period running up to the annexation of Austria in March 1938. They represented… Continue reading

Why Some Composers and not Others?

This article was posted some time ago, but appears to have been swallowed somewhere along the line. No matter, it’s good to review such things and my thoughts on this subject have certainly… Continue reading

Migrants, Immigrants, Refugees, Asylum Seekers

“Migrants”, “immigrants”, “refugees”, “asylum seekers”: these are the last words I hear at night as I switch off the news and the first I read in my morning paper. For several decades now,… Continue reading

The False Myths and True Genius of Erich Wolfgang Korngold

1897 was an eventful year for music in Vienna: Johannes Brahms died and Gustav Mahler took over the Imperial Opera; the Eleven-year-old Ernst Toch decided to become a composer and in Brno, or… Continue reading

The Ominous Case of the Hans Winterberg Puzzle

As of today – that is to say 17th of July, 2015, I have heard that the embargo on the life, work and musical estate of Hans Winterberg has been lifted. I shall… Continue reading