Leo Carey’s fascinating review of new books on Mahler in the New York Review of Books

It’s been some time since I’ve written on this blog, and having just returned from a fascinating trip to the United States, there is a good deal to write about. All of this… Continue reading

The Lost Legacy of the Netherlands

Every conference has its revelations. The one in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern’s lovely capital city Schwerin in early October 2015 was no different. After decades of researching material and believing that perhaps it was possible to… Continue reading

The Musical Price Paid for British Betrayal

The story of Czechoslovakia’s betrayal is illustrated by the loss of composers who were either murdered or died in exile. This is merely to underline again that it is head-in-the-sand to declare politics… Continue reading

G.E.R. Gedye’s Eye-Witness Account of Austro-Fascism

In this blog and in my book Forbidden Music, I have tried to stress the importance of the five year period running up to the annexation of Austria in March 1938. They represented… Continue reading

Why Some Composers and not Others?

This article was posted some time ago, but appears to have been swallowed somewhere along the line. No matter, it’s good to review such things and my thoughts on this subject have certainly… Continue reading

Migrants, Immigrants, Refugees, Asylum Seekers

“Migrants”, “immigrants”, “refugees”, “asylum seekers”: these are the last words I hear at night as I switch off the news and the first I read in my morning paper. For several decades now,… Continue reading

The False Myths and True Genius of Erich Wolfgang Korngold

1897 was an eventful year for music in Vienna: Johannes Brahms died and Gustav Mahler took over the Imperial Opera; the Eleven-year-old Ernst Toch decided to become a composer and in Brno, or… Continue reading

The Ominous Hans Winterberg Puzzle

Over the last months, everything we thought we knew about Hans Winterberg has been turned on its head. The posting I made some two years ago resulted in enormous interest and re-opened an… Continue reading

Where Culture Intersects with History – The Music Estate

This is the modified text of a lecture I recently gave at London Royal College of Music. Click on the photos to enlarge them and to read the documents more easily What’s found… Continue reading

Thomas Hampson’s ‘Mirror of the World’ Broadcast

Thomas Hampson has put together a remarkable series of art-song broadcasts called Mirror of the World. His latest is based on my book Forbidden Music. When I posted the link on Facebook, only… Continue reading